Goal Setting not working? Get on to OKRs!

The concept of OKRs originated in Intel attributed to Andy Grove, and popularized by John Doerr; he took it to Google way back in 1999 when they were about 60 people and two decades later, they still use it! In the words of Larry Page, CEO of Alphabet and Co- Founder of Google, “OKRs have helped lead us to 10X growth, many times over.”

Feature section

The feature layout is built with flex, like the hero layout. Don’t like our typesetting? You can update every detail in the typography section of the Style panel.

You can also add spacing between the heading and paragraph, swap a video in for the image, or add a button. Just make sure to drop your button into the div block that contains this content.

OK-what?

Yeah, we still get that a lot.

The concept of OKRs originated in Intel attributed to Andy Grove, and popularized by John Doerr; he took it to Google way back in 1999 when they were about 60 people and two decades later, they still use it! In the words of Larry Page, CEO of Alphabet and Co- Founder of Google, “OKRs have helped lead us to 10X growth, many times over.”

True that!  

So, what are OKRs?

OKRs is a Goal Management framework; a great way to run not only your teams or your company, but also your own personal goals and ambitions! Deceptively simple yet highly effective, OKRs are made up of three parts:

· Objectives are about “Where do I want to go?”  

· Key Results focus on the “How do I get there?”

· Tasks / Initiatives which is “What do I need to do to get there".


Now, let’s put it into practice.

Let’s just say you want to go on that trek (or hike) you’ve been waiting to conquer. You would need some pretty intensive preparation to get there.  


# 1: Keep Objectives qualitative

Objectives are simple, yet inspiring statements written qualitatively.

In our trekking example, a good objective would go something like “Successfully reach the Summit”. In the business world, “Increase Revenue, Increase Margins, Increase customer reach, Make a kick ass Product” are typically great to build objectives around.


#2: Metric focused KRs

Numbers enable objective evaluation and help create a learning process. For the above example, the KRs could be “To be able to complete 5k in 35 minutes” or “Increase endurance by X%age” Think through initiatives/ tasks which will help you bring it to action.  For instance, “Speaking to 5 trek providers in 2 weeks will help you identify the best one”.  Or “Attending strength and conditioning workouts every alternate day would make those muscles matter to reach 5K in 35 minutes’


#3: Stretched, but not impossible

OKRs are ambitious and much different from the ‘Goldilocks Goals’ of being Just right. Build a stretch component into the OKRs so that getting to a score of 70-80% at quarter-end is an achievement! If you are consistently hitting 100%, you are probably staying in your comfort zone. And if you’re under 30%, the OKR was too stretched in the first place.


#4: Keep it short and simple!

Atmost 5 Objectives with 3-5 KRs each is the maximum recommended number. Having more is just going to get you to lose focus on what’s really important. May also run the risk of micro-managing than empowering your team!


#5: More than the ‘Regular’ reviews

While OKRs are updated periodically, tracking and reviewing the OKRs regularly is key to making it a success. If every week is not possible, sit with your teams at least once a fortnight to review them.


So, what are you waiting for?


Jump onto the OKR bandwagon today and move from just OK to Remarkable! To make it easier, write in to us to help you transition to a culture of continuous performance.


Optimize Remote Teams
Drive Business ResultsCoach Your Teams